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Hay Testing and Soil Testing for Forage

The principle of testing is the same: know what you've got since looking at a bale of hay or an acre of ground doesn't tell all. Hay with a low proportion of leaves to stem can't provide the balance of energy, protein, minerals and fiber. Soils needing lime that test low in potassium and phosphorus will produce only a fraction of yield under drought or plant stress. When Mother Nature provides the rain and sun for plant growth then a fertile, productive soil responds to produce pastures of plenty. That reduces your hay purchases and gives you the best quality "hay": natural, selective grazing by your horse.

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Pasture Management: More Than Green Grass

Techniques For Proper Pasture Management

When you look at your pasture what  do you see? Some people look at pastures as a place to turn their horse out for  exercise while others realize a pasture can be an important part of their total  feeding program. Unfortunately it's not as simple as watching the grass grow  and turning your horse out in the field. Proper pasture management has many  components spread across all four seasons.


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How to Keep Baby Chicks Warm

Because it is essential that new chicks  stay warm without overheating, it's a good idea to prepare their brooder at  least 24 hours before their arrival. Selecting the right heat lamp and setting  the ideal temperature will ensure a healthy climate for your chicks.

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Tips on How to Care For Your New Baby Chicks

Raising chickens has become a popular activity as more people have gained interest in sustainable living. Whether you are raising chickens for eggs, meat, or as a hobby, you want to ensure that your brood stays healthy. The experts at Southern States know that keeping your chicks warm, watered and fed is the key to raising happy, healthy chicks. Just follow these tips and you will be off to a great start!

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Common Chicken Problems

What To Watch Out For

Maintaining a backyard flock offers great rewards, but it's not always easy to keep your chickens stress-free — especially when they're young. Understanding the environmental, nutritional and pest threats your chicks may encounter and knowing how to react to these challenges will ensure your chicks grow to be healthy, producing hens.

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How to Grow Broccoli, Cauliflower and Other Brassicas

If you have a summer vegetable garden, you probably grow tomatoes, cucumbers and even carrots,  but have you ever grown broccoli and cauliflower? Because broccoli and cauliflower are cool season vegetables, you can extend your garden's growing  season with these delicious, nutritious brassicas. Follow these tips to grow your own broccoli and cauliflower.

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Exposing Chicks To House Pets Or Other Farm Animals

4 Tips To Protect Your Chicks

It's not uncommon for domestic cats and dogs to want to make a tasty  treat out of chicks or even full-grown chickens. However, while your pets may  behave unpredictably around your chicks, there are steps you can take to  protect your new feathered friends.

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Controlling Moles, Voles and Shrews in the Lawn

The raised ridged areas across your lawn caused by tunneling  below the ground's surface are tell-tale signs of unwanted creatures in your  yard. Moles, voles and shrews can wreak havoc on lawns causing damage to the  root system of your grass and ruining the look of your lawn. Their tunneling  may cause destruction to your flowers, vegetables and shrubbery. Once they have  arrived, what do you do? The experts at Southern States can show you how to  identify which burrowing creatures have invaded your yard and how to get rid of  them.

The first step to removing these unwanted creatures is to  identify what ground-burrowing critters you are up against. Moles are the  largest, ranging in size from 5 – 7 inches with velvety fur and paddle-like  forelimbs for digging. Voles are approximately 4 to 5 inches long and covered  with short, brown fur. Shrews are the smallest of the three averaging slightly  less than 4 inches in length with short, grayish fur.

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Preventing Grass Tetany In Cattle

As the days start to get longer  and spring nears, it’s time to start guarding your herd against grass  tetany.  Most frequently occurring in the  spring, grass tetany incidents often follow a cool period (45-60°F) when grass  is growing rapidly.  Early grass growth  may be high in potassium and low in magnesium.   This excess potassium can interfere with magnesium absorption in cattle  resulting in tetany.

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